What is nature-positive?

We are currently living in a nature-negative world, where we destroy nature faster than it can replenish itself. We are living outside our planetary boundary for biodiversity loss.

Nature-positive is a reversal of this status quo, and describes a state where nature’s ecosystems and species are actively conserved and regenerated by businesses, governments and individuals alike. 

Where did the term come from?

In order to fight climate change, we need to collectively become carbon-neutral. I know this. You know this.

The goal of ‘carbon-neutral’ gives people something to rally behind, and the addition of ‘by 2050’ creates urgency and enables transparency and accountability. The phrase 'carbon-neutral by 2050’ is used to educate and inspire people in boardrooms, government chambers, universities, labs and household dining rooms alike. 

Nature-positive by 2030 is the counterpart to carbon-neutral by 2050.

In order to prevent our ecosystems from irreversible collapse, we need to reach:

  • zero net loss of nature from 2020;
  • a net positive improvement in nature by 2030; and
  • a full recovery of nature by 2050.

Nature-positive is as much an educational tool and global goal as it is a looming deadline. 

Our collective goal is a full recovery of nature by 2050. Source: WWF.

Use it in a sentence

A thriving future for all species will only be secured when we are living in a nature-positive, carbon-neutral world.

Food for thought

Many businesses offset their carbon emissions and the biodiversity loss they cause, while others have 1% pledges, philanthropic arms and green funds. All of this work is necessary. But what would it look like for businesses to become truly nature-positive at their core? Can you imagine a world where businesses play an active role in securing a vibrant, biodiverse, prosperous future for all species? 

Share this post

Related posts

To'ak, TMA and local Ecuadorian farmers are using cacao to reverse deforestation 

To'ak, TMA and local Ecuadorian farmers are using cacao to reverse deforestation 

“The critical factor that convinces local farmers to reforest their land is the premium prices they will be paid by To’ak for their cacao.”
Bronte McHenry
June 26, 2024
June 26, 2024
6
min read
Learning by doing at The Quoin

Learning by doing at The Quoin

The Quoin is our 5,000-hectare demonstration landscape in the Tasmanian Midlands.
Bronte McHenry
June 26, 2024
June 5, 2024
10
min read
Budget in surplus, nature in deficit

Budget in surplus, nature in deficit

What good is a budget surplus if nature has been in deficit for centuries?
Bronte McHenry
June 26, 2024
May 20, 2024
6
min read